coloricombo 2023: The ninth #coloritree prompt

About the March Challenge

This is the ninth prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March. Use the colour prompts along with optional dark and neutral light colours to create something in your own way, regardless of media or theme.


“Landscape with Trees and Distant Buildings”, Oil on canvas, Mary Swanzy 1920s

Today’s post is the penultimate one for March’s #coloritree challenge and Esté has chosen colours from a painting by the fantastic Irish artist Mary Swanzy.

Swanzy (1882-1978) was an Irish painter, born in Dublin. She was a pioneering modernist artist who explored many different styles and mediums over her long career. Swanzy studied at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art and later at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. She was greatly influenced by the Cubist movement and the work of Pablo Picasso, and this is evident in many of her paintings.

In 1920 during the Irish War of Independence, she left Ireland, traveling first through Eastern Europe and then onwards to Hawaii and Samoa.

During this time, she experimented with a variety of styles, including Surrealism, Expressionism and Cubism, and her work became more abstract. She was also interested in the art of other cultures, particularly the Arab and Indian art she encountered on her travels.

By 1946 she was included in exhibitions with Chagall, William Scott and Henry Moore but after this time her work fell into obscurity, possibly because of her gender and her non-traditional approach to painting. She is now recognized as one of Ireland’s most important modernist painters. Her paintings are held in many public and private collections, including the National Gallery of Ireland and the Irish Museum of Modern Art.


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Granny Smith, Sea Green, Acid Yellow, Grass Green and Deep Green.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricombo and @estemacleod and @lorisiebert.studio when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

Join me for a retreat in Italy FALL 2024

Adventures in Mixed Media Collage with Lori Siebert

Join me from 23rd – 30th August 2024 on a week-long Art Retreat in Central Italy


In this adventurous workshop, I will help you to foster your childlike curiosity and the joy of discovery. As we explore the medieval villages, take in the beautiful countryside and local wildlife, shop at the local markets… I will assign fun creative challenges that will bring these magical experiences into your work.

This workshop is perfect for everyone from beginners to advanced artists. Lori loves to encourage and foster creativity in everyone!


Awaken your creativity whilst experiencing the people and the flavours of day-to-day life in truly authentic, unspoilt Italy

Retreat Centre & Small Luxury Boutique Hotel In Le Marche, Italy

Imagine staying in an historic palazzo nestled on the edge of a picture-postcard medieval, hilltop village in the heart of Le Marche. Sitting elegantly between the Sibillini Mountains and the Adriatic Coast is Hotel Leone, a luxury boutique hotel with 10 bedrooms, that specialises in small, intimate boutique retreats. Each individually curated, giving you the freedom, space and inspiration to nourish you and your creativity.

Le Marche, in Central Italy, what the Italians themselves refer to as ‘all of Italy in one region’ remains one of the very few places which has escaped mass tourism despite its beauty and diversity: medieval hill-top towns full of art and culture, amazing coastline with hidden beaches, patchwork quilt countryside, stunning mountain ranges and much more – it really is a secret slice of Italy.

Combine your love of creativity with exploring new places and meeting like-minded people where you can sit back and relax knowing everything is taken care of for you.


SPACES ARE VERY LIMITED AND FILLING FAST!!!

Hope you can join me!!! It’s going to be dreamy!!!

XO

coloricombo 2023: The eighth #coloritree prompt

About the March Challenge

This is the eighth prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March. Use the colour prompts along with optional dark and neutral light colours to create something in your own way, regardless of media or theme.


“Autumn Landscape”, Oil on canvas, Gerhild Diesner, 1945

It’s the eighth post of this March’s #coloritree challenge and today we are featuring a work from the Austrian (not another Australian) artist Gerhild Diesner.

Diesner (1915-1995) is recognised as one of the most important Austrian artists of the 20th century. She was born in Innsbruck, the capital of the Tirol region, the fourth of five children.

Her first art lessons were at her school in Geneva in 1930. She summered in England and in 1935 stayed there to attend the Chelsea Art School and the School of Art in Brighton. Her studies here and later in Paris at the Academy André Lhote and the École de la Grande Chaumière exposed her to the work of Lhote, Gauguin, Van Gogh and Matisse and greatly influenced her expressive and vibrant colours.

Diesner worked in oils and gouaches and produced drawings and canvases as well as mosaics, wall paintings and tapestries.


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Citrine, Caramel, Mahogany and Cadet Grey.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricombo and @estemacleod and @lorisiebert.studio when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

Bravo on all of your beautiful work this month!

XO

#coloricombo 2023: The seventh #coloritree prompt

About the March Challenge

This is the seventh prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March. Use the colour prompts along with optional dark and neutral light colours to create something in your own way, regardless of media or theme.


“Art is art, nature is nature, you cannot improve upon it . . . Pictures should be inspired by nature, but made in the soul of the artist; it is the soul of the individual that counts.” – Emily Carr

“Western Forest”, Oil on canvas, Emily Carr, 1931

Emily Carr (1871-1945) was a Canadian artist and writer whose inspiration was the coastal environment of the Pacific Northwest where she lived, it’s landscapes and the First Nations who inhabit it. Although she is regarded as one of Canada’s most famous and important artists with her Modernist and Post-Impressionist style, she was in her late fifties before she started to receive the recognition deserved.

Carr was born in Victoria, British Columbia in 1871 (the year that British Columbia joined Canada) the second youngest of nine children. Her parents encouraged her artistic ambitions but it was only after their deaths during her teenage years that she began to pursue art seriously with education in San Francisco and London.

After her first trip to a First Nation settlement in 1898, Carr became deeply interested in the people of British Columbia and their cultures and she spent much of her career painting their totem poles, villages, and landscapes. Her work is notable for its vivid use of colour and her ability to capture the spirit and energy of the places she painted.

In 1910 Carr travelled to France where she was greatly influenced by both the Post-Impressionists and the Fauvists she encountered. She returned to Vancouver, opened a studio and gave classes which were apparently unpopular due to her smoking and cursing. Losing students, she moved back to Victoria and ran a boarding house for the next fifteen years.

Aged fifty seven in 1927, her work caught the attention of The Group of Seven, Canada’s most recognised modern painters who recognised her talent and embraced her as an equal. This led to one of her most prolific periods and the creation of many of her most notable works.

Carr suffered from poor health from the late 1930s and after a number of heart attacks and a stroke, with her ability to travel impaired, her focus shifted to writing. She published several books about her experiences in British Columbia, including “Klee Wyck,” (her adopted Indigenous name) which won the Governor General’s Award for non-fiction in 1941. She died in Victoria in 1945

In 1952 her works were shown at the Venice Bienalle and in 1978 she was posthumously was awarded the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts Medal. Today there’s a statue of her close to the provincial legislature and a university named after her, the Emily Carr University of Art & Design in Vancouver.


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Kiwi, Jade, Navy and Van Dyke Brown.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricombo, @lorisiebert.studio and @estemacleod when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

#coloricombo 2023: The sixth #coloritree prompt

About the March Challenge

This is the sixth prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March. Use the colour prompts along with optional dark and neutral light colours to create something in your own way, regardless of media or theme.


Today it’s over to the island of Ireland for the sixth artist to be featured in #coloritree, Norah McGuinness.

“Girls In The Garden, Early Summer”, Gouache, Norah McGuinness, ~1930

McGuinness (1901-1980) was an Irish artist known for her colourful and lively works in a variety of mediums, including painting, printmaking, and tapestry. She was born in Derry, Northern Ireland, and began her artistic career in 1921 at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art where she studied under Patrick Tuohy, Oswald Reeves and Harry Clarke. Her first freelance work was as an illustrator, which remained an important source of income throughout her life.

From Dublin, McGuinness moved to London to study at the Chelsea Polytechnic where she began exhibiting her work in group shows. Her time in London exposed her to the work of modernist artists who greatly influenced her own artistic style. After working as a set designer in Dublin’s theatres, McGuinness moved to Paris in 1929 where she worked with André Lhôte (who I mentioned previously in connection with Dorrit Black) for nearly two years and was influenced by the work of Braque, Lurçat, Dufy and Vlaminck.

In the 1930s, McGuinness became involved in the British art world and joined the influential London Group, which included artists such as Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth. She also began working as a freelance designer, creating book covers and illustrations for publishers such as Faber & Faber and the Hogarth Press. In 1937 McGuinness returned once more to Ireland where she was involved in the Irish Exhibition of Living Art, taking over it’s presidency in 1944 (a position she held for almost thirty years).

She represented Ireland in the 1950 Venice Biennale (the first year that Ireland had taken part) and her work was exhibited in numerous solo and group shows, including a retrospective at the Irish Museum of Modern Art in 2002.

McGuinness’s work is characterized by its bold use of colour, strong geometric shapes, and playful compositions. She executed vivid, highly coloured, flattened landscape paintings, still lifes and portraits in a spontaneous style showing both Fauvist and the Cubist influences of Lhôte.


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Fandango Pink, Duck Egg, Warm Brown, Straw and Cobalt Blue.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricombo and @estemacleod and @lorisiebert.studio when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

caption for image

I need to get on making some challenge art now that I’m back from Alt Summit!!

XO

coloricombo 2023: The fifth #coloritree prompt

Sorry, I’m a day late on this next prompt. I’m away at the amazing Alt Summit in Palm Springs!!

Here is the next beautiful palette!


About the March Challenge

This is the fifth prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March. Use the colour prompts along with optional dark and neutral light colours to create something in your own way, regardless of media or theme.


The fifth artist we are featuring during this March Challenge is another amazing woman from Australia.

“The Windswept Farm”, Colour linocut on paper, Dorrit Black, 1937

Dorrit Black (1891-1951) was a painter and printmaker and is now regarded as one of Australia’s most important modern artists, instrumental in bringing Cubism to the continent from Europe.

Black was born in Adelaide and studied in London and Paris during the 1920s where she worked with some of the leading modern art teachers of the time, such as the British linocut printmaker Claude Flight and the French cubists André Lhote and Albert Gleizes.

On her return she became the first female gallery owner in Australia when her European experiences inspired her to establish the Modern Art Centre in Sydney in 1931.

She returned to Adelaide in 1933 and was an influential artist, both as a teacher and a pioneer of Australian modernism. Unfortunately she never achieved the widespread recognition that she deserved in her lifetime. Black died aged fifty nine when she was involved in a car accident whilst driving her blue Fiat convertible in Norwood, a suburb of Adelaide.

Black’s art is characterised by its bold and dynamic compositions, strong lines, and striking use of colour. She was known for her work in a range of mediums, including painting, printmaking, and sculpture. Black was also an advocate for the recognition of Aboriginal art and culture.


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Salmon Mousse, Sand, Warm Sage, Seaweed.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricombo and @estemacleod and @lorisiebert.studio when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

coloricombo 2023: The fourth #coloritree prompt

March Challenge

This is the fourth prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March.


“One could pick almost any painting of a doorway or window that Dodd did between 1971 and 1997, a stretch of more than twenty-five years, and quickly discern the following; all of them establish a palpable relationship between subject matter and picture plane”

-John Yau

“Apple Tree (Pruned)”, Oil on masonite, Lois Dodd, 2014

With the research Este is doing for this March Challenge, a focus on female artists who created paintings featuring trees, she has discovered some wonderful artists that were not known to her before and she is so pleased to have discovered Lois Dodd.

Dodd (b. 1927) is an American artist who’s known for her vibrant paintings of landscapes and still lifes. Born in Montclair, New Jersey, she attended Cooper Union in New York straight after the Second World War. There she studied textile design but she painted throughout and eventually abandoned textiles altogether after graduation. She also attended the Skowhegan School in Maine then later taught at the Brooklyn College and the Skowhegan School.

In 1951, Dodd moved to Italy with the sculptor William King. When they returned to New York, they were involved in the Tanager Gallery. It remained open until 1962 and was the most influential of the cooperative galleries based around Tenth Street, attracting artists like Alex Katz, Willem de Kooning, Philip Guston and Helen Frankenthaler.

Dodd’s paintings are defined by their bold use of colour and composition and they evoke a sense of joy, often due to their simplicity. She depicts everyday scenes including still lives, views from her studio and buildings and windows all whilst working quickly, often sketching a scene before the light changes. Dodd is an observational artist who worked at the time (and place) when both Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art were dominant.

Dodd has exhibited her work in numerous institutions across the United States, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. In 2012, she was the subject of a retrospective entitled Catching the Light. Dodd still paints and lives between houses in New York City and Maine.


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Pale Heather, Raisin, Apple Green and Soft Mint.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricombo and @estemacleod and @lorisiebert.studio when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

Four Seasons

A little treat coming up, when #coloritree finishes there will be a mini-course offered in April through Este. Four Seasons is a five day course linked to the topic of trees and will run from 1-5 April with free access during the month of April. More information about this course will be released on 13 March.

We are loving all of your works.

XO

coloricombo 2023: The third #coloritree prompt

March Challenge

This is the third prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March.


“When I paint, I am happy and I am in another world.”

– Baya Mahieddine

“Women & Orange Trees on a White Background”, Gouache on board, Baya Mahieddine, 1947

On 8 March it will be International Women’s Day. This day is celebrated around the world and raises awareness of issues such as gender equality, reproductive rights and violence and abuse against women. If you’ve been receiving #coloricombo prompts for a while, you’ve probably noticed that Este likes to feature female artists in her weekly prompts.

All of the March #coloritree prompts are dedicated to women who made contributions as artists and who left their own unique legacies. Throughout history, women have been underrepresented and often dissuaded from making art and on the week of International Women’s Day we want to draw attention to an artist who influenced one of the most celebrated artists of all time whilst she was still a teenager!

Baya Mahieddine, or simply Baya as she styled herself (1931-1998) was an Algerian artist who gained international recognition for her unique style that combined North African, Middle Eastern and European influences.

Born in Bordj El Kiffan, Algiers, Baya lost her parents at the age of five and was raised by her grandmother on a French-colonial farm. She didn’t attend school and at age eleven started working there as a servant to the farm owner’s sister, Marguerite Camina, later described as Maya’s adoptive mother.

Camina was a painter with a personal collection including works by Braque and Matisse, who recognised Baya’s self-taught talents. She showed Baya’s work to a gallery owner friend who arranged a solo exhibition in Paris in 1947 when Baya was only sixteen. This was attended by numerous famous artists of the day, including Picasso and she became an overnight sensation with both artists and critics praising her primitive style.

Baya’s work features vibrant colours and bold shapes inspired by her personal experiences and motifs drawn from Kabyle arts. She often depicted women (men are never shown), animals and trees and her work was celebrated for its originality and authenticity.

In 1948, Baya was invited to become artist-in-residence at the Madoura pottery studio the south of France, where she was based until 1952 working her summers alongside Picasso who would later cite her as an inspirations for his Women of Algiers series.

In 1952 Baya returned to Algiers, married and raised six children over the period that Algeria was seeking independence from France. It would be 1963 before she resumed painting, living for the rest of her life between Algeria and France.


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Tangelo Orange, Soft Lavender, Pastel Matcha, Acqua and Han Blue.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricomboand #estemacleod and @lorisiebert.studio when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

heart2heart2023 Instagram challenge winners announced!!

You all created such beautiful heart art during this Feb. challenge co-hosted with my friends:

Mary Ann Johnson

Kelli May Krenz

Vanessa Johanning

We LOVED seeing all of your creativity!!!

(I was bummed not to join in more. I’ve had a very busy travel schedule lately!)

Here are the judges selections!!


Robert Mahar picks:

Lorrie Veasey


Laura Socinski


Rosanna Dell


Uta Krogmann


Kate Dittman (Hallmark) picks:

Laura Socinski


Printware Studios


Uta Krogmann


 Cindy Winter (Paper Crown) picks:

Suzan Baldoumas


Laura Socinski


Shannon Christensen


Kelly Henderson

#coloricombo 2023: The second #coloritree prompt

Here is the second prompt for the Instagram challenge that I am currently co-hosting with Este MacLeod.

Have you checked out the gorgeous art already posted at #coloritree?? Beautiful work!!


“It has been said that modern art is international but it is important for a great nation to make a cultural stand. My wish is to see a combined attempt by our artists to give us an art that no other country in the world can produce.”

– Margaret Preston


The second artist to be featured in this #coloritree March Challenge is Margaret Preston. Preston (1875-1963) was one of Australia’s most significant modernist painters and was known for her paintings and woodcuts of local landscapes and native flora. She was also one of the first non-indigenous Australian artists to use Aboriginal motifs in her work.

Preston was born in Adelaide and moved to Sydney in 1888 for studies under the landscape painter William Lister Lister. These were followed by further education in Melbourne and at the Adelaide School of Design. She travelled to Europe in 1904, studying in Munich and Paris and later travels brought back to France and to London at the outbreak of World War One. There she studied pottery and had work exhibited at the Royal Academy.

On her voyage home in 1918, Preston met her husband who had served in the Australian Imperial Force. They settled in Sydney where she worked on still lifes in a modernist style and began working in woodcut. She established herself as the most prominent Australian woman artist of the 1920s and 1930s.

Preston continued to travel extensively, throughout the Pacific, Asia, India and Africa and had a keen interest in non-European art and culture. She was particularly interested in exploring the relationship between colour, shape, and texture in her art and featured uniquely Australian subjects, such as native flora and fauna or scenes from domestic settings.

Throughout her career, Preston was a strong advocate for the promotion of Australian art and culture. She was a member of several art societies and wrote extensively on Australian art and its place in the world.

“Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden”, Colour stencil, gouache on card, Margaret Preston, 1950


Colour Combination

The colours for this weeks prompt are Blue Skies, Eucalyptus, Dough and Pewter Blue.

For this March Challenge, please add the tag #coloritree along with the usual #coloricombo and #estemacleod and tag @lorisiebert.studio when posting on Instagram. You are also welcome to post on the private Facebook group Creative Prompts with Esté MacLeod.

March Challenge

This is the second prompt for #coloritree, part of the ongoing #coloricombo 2023 challenge. There will be ten posts in total, all linked to artworks featuring trees by female artists from the past. These will be released on Monday and Thursday until the end of March.